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1000 SMOKERS WANTED!
87,000 people in Suffolk smoke
We'd like to help 1,000 quit
 
• Free support programmes
from a stop smoking expert
• Medication available
• Advice on stress & weight gain
   
Call us now on 01473 22 92 92 or complete the form below

Here’s some advice, videos and tools to help you stop smoking.

However, you’re far more likely to succeed with some extra guidance and support – click here to find out about our free and friendly stop smoking service.

Call us now on 01473 22 92 92 or contact us via other means by clicking here

Bikes10 health benefits of stopping smoking Quit smoking and you'll be healthier, your skin will look better and you'll have better sex.
Smoking’s bad for your health, but exactly how does quitting make life better? Here are 10 ways your health will improve when you stop smoking.

Better sex

Stopping smoking improves the body’s bloodflow, so improves sensitivity. Men who stop smoking may get better erections. Women may find that their orgasms improve and they become aroused more easily. It’s also been found that non-smokers are three times more apealling to prospective partners than smokers (one of the advantages, perhaps, of smelling fresh).

Find out more tips for having good sex.

Improved fertility

Non-smokers find it easier to get pregnant. Quitting smoking improves the lining of the womb and can make men’s sperm more potent. Becoming a non-smoker increases the possibility of conceiving through IVF and reduces the likelihood of having a miscarriage. Most importantly, it improves the chances of giving birth to a healthy baby.

Read more about how to protect your fertility.

Younger looking skin

Stopping smoking has been found to slow facial ageing and delay the appearance of wrinkles. The skin of a non-smoker gets more nutrients, including oxygen, and can reverse the sallow, lined complexion that smokers often have.

Watch this video to find out how smoking can ruin your looks.

Whiter teeth

Giving up tobacco stops teeth becoming stained, and you'll have fresher breath. Ex-smokers are less likely than smokers to get gum disease and lose their teeth prematurely.

Find out more about dental health.

Better breathing

People breathe more easily and cough less when they give up smoking because their lung capacity improves by up to 10% within nine months. In your 20s and 30s, the effect of smoking on your lung capacity may not be noticeable until you go for a run, but lung capacity naturally diminishes with age. In later years, having maximum lung capacity can mean the difference between having an active, healthy old age and wheezing when going for a walk or climbing the stairs.

Longer life

Half of all long-term smokers die early from smoking-related diseases, including heart disease, lung cancer and chronic bronchitis. Men who quit smoking by 30 add 10 years to their life. People who kick the habit at 60 add three years to their life. In other words, it’s never too late to benefit from stopping. Quitting not only adds years to your life, but it also greatly improves the chance of a disease-free, mobile, happier old age.

Less stress

Scientific studies show that people's stress levels are lower after they stop smoking. Nicotine addiction makes smokers stressed from the ‘withdrawal’ between cigarettes. The pleasant feeling of satisfying that craving is only temporary and is not a real cure for stress. Also, the improved levels of oxygen in the body means that ex-smokers can concentrate better and have increased mental wellbeing.

Read our top 10 stress-busters.

Improved smell and taste

Kicking the smoking habit gives your senses of smell and taste a boost. The body is recovering from being dulled by the hundreds of toxic chemicals found in cigarettes.

More energy

Within 2 to 12 weeks of stopping smoking, your circulation improves. This makes all physical activity, including walking and running, much easier.

Quitting also boosts your immune system, making it easier to fight off colds and flu. The increase in oxygen in the body makes ex-smokers less tired and less likely to have headaches.

Read these self-help tips to fight fatigue.

Healthier loved ones

By stopping smoking you'll be protecting the health of your non-smoking friends and family.

Passive smoking increases a non-smoker's risk of lung cancer, heart disease and stroke. Second-hand smoke makes children twice at risk of chest illnesses, including pneumonia, croup (swollen airways in the lungs) and bronchitis, plus more ear infections, wheezing and asthma. They also have three times the risk of getting lung cancer in later life compared with children who live with non-smokers.

Now, read about smoking treatments available on the NHS and find out how to get started on stopping smoking.

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BikesQuit making excuses The seven top excuses smokers use to avoid stopping smoking, and how to overcome them.

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BikesUnder-18s guide to quitting Seven reasons for teen smokers to quit, and eight ways to help yourself through it.
The younger you start smoking, the more damage your body will suffer when you get older. Here's seven reasons to quit and eight ways to help yourself do it.

1. You’ll be healthier and less out of breath because smoking decreases your lung capacity.

2. You’ll save yourself a packet. The average smoker spends an astonishing £27.54 a week and £90,000 over their lifetime on cigarettes.

3. You’ll look better. Chemicals in cigarettes restrict blood flow to your skin. Smokers have more wrinkled and saggy faces by the time they’re in their mid-20s.

4. Quitting helps save the planet. Deforestation due to tobacco production accounts for nearly 5% of overall deforestation in the developing world, according to research published in the medical journal The BMJ.

5. Someone who starts smoking at 15 is three times more likely to die from cancer than someone who starts smoking in their mid-20s. Read more about the dangers of teen smoking.

6. The younger you start smoking, the more damage there will be to your body as an adult. Read more about the dangers of teen smoking.

7. Not smoking will make you instantly more attractive. Most people prefer kissing non-smokers. Read what some hot male celebrities, including footballers Joe Cole, Les Ferdinand and Cristiano Ronaldo, think about girls who smoke.

Eight ways to get through quitting

OK, enough of the arm twisting. You want to give up, so where do you start?

1. Make a deal with good friends to quit. You may find that they want to quit as well.

2. It’s very hard to give up by willpower alone. Get all the help you can find: 12 to 18-year-olds get free nicotine replacement therapy (patches, sprays, gum) on the NHS. Ask your GP for help stopping smoking. They won’t be shocked that you’re a smoker.

3. Smokers often hate other people quitting, so be prepared for a few put-downs. It’s a good idea to have something ready to say when you’re offered a cigarette. Here are a few reasons (but we’re sure you can think of better ones):

"Smoking costs me £xxx a year. I’m giving up so I can buy myself a new mobile/driving lessons/a holiday."
"I can’t smoke in my new weekend job so I want to give up."
"My boyfriend/girlfriend doesn’t like kissing a smoker." It’s true: two-thirds of teenagers say smoking reduces sexual attractiveness.
"I’m taking my sport seriously and I need to give up if I want to be an athlete."

4. Prepare for a tough few days when you first quit. Most people find that the first days are the hardest to cope with. But most of your withdrawal symptoms should subside after the first four weeks. Using nicotine gum and patches (NRT) is the best way to cope with cravings.

5. Worried about weight gain while you’re quitting? Load your bag up with low-calorie snacks, such as apple chips, carrot sticks, mints, popcorn or chewing gum, to get you through the cravings.

Read more about how you can quit smoking without putting on weight.

6. Get your family to support you. Your parents will be on your side. If they don’t know you smoke, they might freak out at first, but if you tell them you’re quitting they’ll do all they can to help.

7. Do your best to stay away from alcohol, coffee, sugar and sweets while you quit. Studies have shown that these foods (especially the booze) can stimulate cigarette cravings. Here's some advice on how to cut down on your drinking.

8. And remember, it takes about a month for the nicotine cravings to subside. Take it one day at a time and soon you’ll be smokefree for the rest of your life. 

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A smoker's tale (video)A smoker's tale (video) Megan is 16 and a smoker. A make-up artist transforms her appearance to demonstrate the effects that smoking will have on her body. Will the results make Megan rethink her habit?

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BikesLung Cancer Awareness (video) Megan is 16 and a smoker. A make-up artist transforms her appearance to demonstrate the effects that smoking will have on her body. Will the results make Megan rethink her habit?

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BikesSmoking calculator (tool) Fill in how many you smoke a day and find out how much your habit is costing you, both financially and to your physical health. Then see the benefits you can gain by giving up.

If you do not have a version of the Flash Player you can download the free Adobe Flash Player from Adobe Systems Incorporated.


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